pantone
 

GDUSA

CURRENT ISSUE
CONTESTS
FREE SUBSCRIPTION
LINKS
FREE STUFF

pantone

GDUSA COLOR FORECAST PREVIEW
SPONSORED BY PANTONE

lepore
Nanette Lepore
sketch from
Pantone Fashion Report
Copyright Pantone Inc.

lepore
Tommy Hilfiger
sketch from
Pantone Fashion Report
Copyright Pantone Inc.

lepore
Lacoste sketch from
Pantone Fashion Report
Copyright Pantone Inc.

PUBLISHER’S NOTE

The May 2010 edition of Graphic Design USA magazine features our annual color forecast. It will be arriving in your mailboxes later this week. Needless to say, color is among the most powerful ways to communicate messages about products, services, causes and ideas. And color forecasts are where theory and practice come together, where the rubber meets the road. As a perfect match, Pantone, the global authority on color, is sponsoring the forecast so that we may bring it to the creative community.

Truthfully, I am not a good source for color commentary: I mostly wear black because it is easy to match, covers up midday coffee spills, and someone once told me it makes you look thinner. Going crazy means something not-black under a black sport jacket. So, let me turn this brief preview of the Annual Color Forecast to the experts at Pantone who have produced some fascinating forecasts that effect graphic design and related disciplines and who, just this week, are introducing the next generation of color standards to serve the creative community.

— Gordon Kaye

THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT

No doubt about it: Color makes a difference, sometimes all the difference. It attracts and engages the eye, elicits specific emotions, and ultimately shapes buying decisions. Color sparks sales, defines spaces, creates ambience and in today’s cluttered and increasingly complex marketplace, as designs are continually simplified, color is becoming a key differentiator. Dramatic and impactful specialty colors like metallics, neons and citrus brights continue to rise to the forefront of design and are becoming go-to colors for creatives across industries.

As technology continues to advance, new variations of metallics develop and create the quintessential “high-tech” look. Once relegated to opulence and glamour — or by contrast, steely engineering — designers are now finding that metallics add a welcome, warming shimmer to more mainstream, everyday products and designs.

Hot, lively colors including neons and citrus brights are also reaching new heights, adding a playful, eccentric pop to design. Fashion is often indicative of future industry trends and brights and neons are no exception. Vibrantly colored athletic apparel, footwear, outerwear, women’s wear, accessories and children’s clothing continue to make an impact on the world of fashion. Additionally, cosmetics are lively and luminous while punchy plastics bring bold expectations to housewares, making hearth and home as inspiring as contemporary works of art. Vivid brights deliberately clash to make products stand out and better express society’s eclectic nature.

Since color directions are complex and evolutionary, these strands show up to a greater or lesser degree, and often with great subtlety, in the Fashion, Home and Interiors, and Design forecasts covered in this month’s edition of GDUSA magazine.

As demand for these specialty colors increases, Pantone has recognized the growing need for metallics, neons and citrus brights and, in response, the PANTONE PLUS SERIES contains over 350.

THE NEXT GENERATION

And what is the PANTONE PLUS SERIES? Described as “the next generation” of the renowned Pantone Matching System, the PANTONE PLUS SERIES provides designers and printers with new features and capabilities. Enhancements include the chromatic arrangement of colors for more intuitive selection, an expanded palette of spot colors, and, as noted above, the addition of new premium metallics and a broader range of neons.

“Pantone Plus takes what designers and printers know and love about the Pantone Matching System and supercharges it with a host of new features, colors and digital tools,” says Ron Potesky, senior vice president and general manager of Pantone. “The series provides designers greater freedom for selecting, specifying and matching color.”

solidchips Recognizing the critical role of digital design and production, PANTONE COLOR MANAGER Software comes free with every PANTONE PLUS SERIES purchase. This enables designers to update their favorite design applications with the new Color Libraries. An added feature allows users to convert spot colors to CMYK simulations based on loaded ICC profiles.

Other hightlights: Creatives can access the entire PANTONE PLUS SERIES from their iPhones with the myPANTONE™ iPhone® application. And all books in the new series are printed on text-weight paper to more closely reflect the majority of printed work today and meet FSC certification standards.

For more information a complete listing of what constitutes the Pantone Plus Series, visit...
http://www.pantone.com/plus